Recently, we compiled a pair of glossaries that should be useful for fans when discussing the Steelers offense and defense. Throughout the summer, we will pull terms and concepts from those glossaries and give them a closer look. Today we break down the Cover-1 scheme with the following questions in mind: now that Antonio Brown is gone, will opposing defenses play more man coverage against the Steelers? And if so, how might we attack it? Let’s take a look. Here’s a quick refresher: in Cover-1, defenders man up against the receiver in front of them while a single-high safety patrols the sky. Man defenders stay attached to their receiver no matter the route, meaning there is no switching or pattern-matching. The safety, meanwhile, looks to either double the offense’s most dangerous threat or anticipate where the quarterback is throwing the football and provide help there. Cover-1 is best used with pressure since it’s unrealistic to expect DBs to stay in coverage for an extended period of time. Often, teams try to disguise their cover-1 looks so an offense can’t check into their man-beaters (more on that momentarily). The combination of pressure with single coverage makes Cover-1 a...