We use them to give you the best experience. If you continue using our website, we’ll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies on this website. Final, flight-approved ducting for air conditioners, 3D printed in ULTEM 9085 resin on the Fortus 450mc. Credit: Stratasys/Business Wire. UK-based aircraft maintenance, modification and design company Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group (Marshall ADG) is using advanced 3D printing from Israeli company Stratasys to produce flight-ready parts for its aircraft. Marshall ADG is also using 3D printing to manufacture ground-running equipment at a lower cost than aluminium alternatives. Privately owned and independent aerospace and defence company Marshall is already using 3D-printed ductwork on modified aircraft, and holders for safety knives and switches for aircraft interiors. The company claimed that on-demand 3D printing of flight-approved parts allows it to produce lighter parts much quicker and at a lower cost compared with traditional methods. Marshall ADG materials, processes and additive manufacturing engineer Chris Botting said: “When manufacturing on complex engineering programmes, we need a method that can create an...