Why the future of streaming TV services like Netflix and Hulu is the cable bundle

What One Day at a Time’s cancellation, Netflix’s battle to retain streaming rights to Friends, and recent Disney announcements have in common. The cancellation of Netflix’s critically beloved cult favorite sitcom One Day at a Time felt like some weird crossed Rubicon for the streaming era — even more so than Netflix canceling the cult comedy American Vandal or Hulu deciding not to order a second season of its Sean Penn-starring The First. (Both events happened in 2018.) One Day at a Time was ostensibly the kind of show the streaming revolution was supposed to support. Its audience might have been small — not that we have any real way of knowing — but it was deeply loyal to the series. What’s more, the show’s majority Latinx cast, as well as its incredibly diverse writers’ room, felt like a prime example of Netflix’s recent attempts to position itself as a home for stories from voices that are rarely front and center in film and television. But none of that ultimately mattered. Whatever the show’s viewership, it was too small for Netflix to justify a fourth season. And in a self-flagellating Twitter thread, the streaming service seemed to suggest that the show’s cancellation was,...

The Gun Lock That A Child Can Open With A Paperclip

In 2010 a three-year-old child was killed because access was gained to a gun safe that contained a handgun. The little boy was the son of a Deputy Sheriff in Vancouver, Washington who had been issued the safe by his department. Unfortunately, that department knew nothing about how to analyze the security of gun safes so they had no idea of how easily that safe could be opened. I wrote about these events and the insecurity of many gun safe designs that were produced by different companies, including Stack-On Corporation, one of the largest supplier of safes in the country. I was also co-counsel in a Class Action lawsuit against the company for their defective security designs in several different safes that they sold. Not much has changed in the design of either gun safes or gunlocks since then. One of my colleagues, Dave Goetzinger, as the result of our findings in 2012, has studiously analyzed many different gun safes and gun locks, including cable locks that are produced under a federal grant and distributed to law enforcement agencies.  His web site should put every parent on notice of the security flaws in many of the safes that are being sold today, and represented as secu...